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Fire escape windows


Guest Richard

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Guest Richard

Dear Sir/Madam

I have just bought a 1st floor apartment. The 2 windows which are suitable for fire escapes are the lounge window (on to a tiled porch roof) and a bedroom window with uniterupted access ( the smaller one of the 2). All the windows were replaced in 2004.

Measurements (cm)

Lounge 210x120 with opening 114x50 (approx 45degrees horizontal hinge)

Bedroom 174x120 with opening 76x50 (approx 45degrees horizontal hinge)

I realise when you replace the windows now they have to meet modern fire regs. We are going to rent it out but not sure whether I need to replace any or one or both! the windows at the back are on to a large conservatory and are similar and there is no direct access from the road. I do have picture I could send to help with my enquiry.

many thanks


Richard

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  • 5 months later...

My son is in a halls of residence that was built in the 60's and has double glazing. The windows slide open a little way but there is a screwed in unit that prevents the window opening further, so not even a small person can get out of the window. I am sure this is to prevent anyone getting into the room, however, in the event of a fire is there any way to get out of such a window or are you trapped in your room?

Jane

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  • 2 months later...

Depends on the height of the building (less than 4.5m) if escape windows are a possible solution for means of escape but thirty years ago it is unlikely to be considered, but if new windows are installed then escape window could be required, but now it is up to your landlord, nobody can force him/her but you could ask.

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  • 2 years later...

My Ex wife is creating a third room in her home, however, it will have no window due to the room being in the centre of the house. But it will have a window in the roof, with a shaft coming down to ceiling level. But there is no access to that window (no ladder) however it can be opened with a long pole. My issue is that there is no means of escape other than its doorway. Plus the room is below the 70feet square it needs to be to be habitable.... due to these factors am I correct in saying that the room cannot be used as a bedroom?

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest garyleigh

i have just have windows installed by a company  fensa regulated .fensa came out and said all up stairs windows have failed they are top hung windows the fensa guy said dont worry they just need to change the hinges the window company came out and changed the whole style of window so now they open like french doors   this is not what i ordered the window company then told me that fensa said they couldnt just change the higes as that wouldnt work but that is what the fensa guy told me when he failed the windows what do i do now 

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  • 1 year later...
Guest Fingers

Hi Tom
I was recently in a Grade 2 listed public house that had an escape window within the first floor toilet area, the window looked to be an original and was single glazed, when opened the window does not stay open, and because it is hinged at the top of the window, it falls back on you and has limited opening space making it really difficult to say the least for anyone to easily evacuate.
The window leads out on to an external roof and across to an external galvanised metal stairway that is very narrow with very little room to put your feet on the treads to which I think is very dangerous and would be very slippy when wet.
Is this acceptable under the fire safety order?
Thanks

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Would everybody, in the future please address your submissions to the forum not to me I am one one of many.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Regards to your question the Offices and shops guide is the appropriate guide and the fire risk assessment would indicate if the situations was acceptable which is required by the RR(FS)O. From what you say it does appear not to be acceptable but to be certain you would need to do a full survey.  The enforcing authority is the local Fire and Rescue Service.

 

 

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I'd say not if it's as you describe, ,it hardly meets the usual criteria for window exits back in the late 20th Century when legislation allowed this more widely, I'd explore the necessity for it at all and other options to secure adequate escape without it.

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  • 1 year later...
Guest Wollyholly

On a first floor rented flat are the internal emergency ladders sufficient in a back bedroom with internal fire doors throughout the flat , there is a main entrance to the flat at the front of the house . 

thanks 

 

 

 

 

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Emergency ladders are not normally accepted as a means of escape, however as an escape window alone would be acceptable, it could be considered better than the minimum, assuming the internal escape route and alarm systems are up to scratch.

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