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  1. Today
  2. Tom Sutton

    annual test certificate for LD2 Grade D system

    Which legislation is the fire safety advisor advising you on The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 or the The Housing Act 2004. In both cases he/she should be using http://privatehousinginformation.co.uk/site/files/LACORS RRO guide 08.pdf for guidance you need to check it out.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Tom Sutton

    beeping smoke alarm

    You need a lot more information, manufacturer, type, which led,s are operating, what is certain the battery is flat or not working?
  5. Guest

    annual test certificate for LD2 Grade D system

    I own a 5 bedroom licensed HMO which has a Grade D alarm system fitted, which the Local Authority are happy with. I am now being told by a fire safety advisor that I have to have fire doors on all the bedrooms. What do you advise. Chris
  6. Tom Sutton

    Crash bar height for nursery

    Panic bars are fitted at a standard height – between 900mm and 1100mm in accordance with BS EN 1125:1997. This height should be taken into consideration when specifying mid rail heights. Where it is known that the majority of the occupants of the premises will be young children, you may wish to reduce the height of the bar and the midrail. However in your situation I would imagine there will always be an adult with the children who will most likely required to assist the children to escape and so they are the most likely to have to open the door not the children.
  7. Tom Sutton

    Emergency lights

    What do means by change emergency lights?
  8. Last week
  9. Check out each of the HM Gov Guides to Fire Risk Assessment - Appendix A
  10. Hi Tom, Thanks for getting back to me. I guess that Building Control will be my next port of call then! Thanks for your help. Kind Regards Martin
  11. My alarm flashes red every 40 seconds but no green light. Is this ok or should something be carried our?
  12. They are not allowed to be kept open at any time unless fitted with a device that will release them to close upon the sounding of the fire alarm - if they are then depending on the category of hold open device and the risk assessment, then they might be left open at night although traditionally automatic fire doors used to have to be closed at night.
  13. No, as Building Regulations is quite clear that you can build risers as a protected shaft without floor separation. It's a horrendously expensive thing to retrofit if done properly and so isn't a simple nice to have so if it isn't needed, don't do it! Some FRS forget it's not fire certification anymore and they can't ask for anything specific anymore. They can highlight they believe there is a breach of one of the articles of the Fire Safety Order and require that it be resolved (or otherwise disproven) either by formal or informal means and if necessary prosecute if there remains a risk to relevant persons due to inaction or unsatisfactory action by the RP but that is all. They can of course suggest a possible solution (they do not have to though and I've seen some enforcement notices that don't) but it is not binding - the RP can propose a different solution or why they believe no action is necessary and if it's reasonable the fire service have to accept it or the case can go to determination or court.
  14. Hello, Last year I purchased a second floor apartment which was purpose built in 2003. The main door from the communal area into the apartment is a fire door with multipoint locking system. The springs in the door mechanism are no longer working and so I was looking to replace either the gearbox within it, or the old unsprung door handles with new sprung ones. As this is a fire door, am I right in thinking that all the fittings also have to be fire rated as I am unable to find any that are. Thanks
  15. Guest

    Crash bar height for nursery

    For a Nursery with 0-5 in attendance is there a maximum height for a crash bar attached to the fire door?
  16. Hi, I work in a supported housing unit for the elderly which have self closing fire doors in the main corridors. The unit is only staffed during the hours of 8am until 10pm and these doors are kept open during these hours. I have been advised to now not close the fire doors at the end of my shift and to keep the fire doors open all night when the unit is unstaffed. I would have thought it was a legal requirement to close these doors during the night and have concerns that the correct procedure is not being followed. Can you advise?
  17. When undertaking a fire risk assessment would you recommend fire stopping (at all floor levels in a multi store residential building) within the service risers even if the service riser itself was constructed to provide 60 minutes protection. I know this sounds like a belt and braces approach but I hear this often from fire officers in that what they want to see, although I appreciate they can sometimes be incorrect in their approach.
  18. Tom Sutton

    CPD

    join FireNet forum there is a thread on the subject. http://www.crisis-response.com/forum/
  19. Cazzys1982

    Emergency lights

    Does a electrician have to change emergency lights or can a handy person change them?
  20. Your plans will be subject to Building Regulation approval so you will need to submit them to your local building control and they will correct any omissions. But my very basic knowledge would say you will have to install fire breaks, around any openings like doors and windows. Also if any internal walls needed to achieve 30 minutes fire resistance ( internal garage or maybe kitchen), they will need to be fire stopped and you may need to create a fire break between the walls and the roof. Study in fine detail ADB vol 1 B3, B4 where you will find out most about fire breaks. Check and study Approved Document B (fire safety) volume 1: Dwellinghouses
  21. Tom Sutton

    Corridor doors connected to fire alarms

    Check out BS 7273-4:2015 Code of practice for the operation of fire protection measures. Actuation of release mechanisms for doors, is the currect British Standard.
  22. AnthonyB

    Fire Action Notice Guest House Bedrooms

    A typical example is here: https://www.mjnsafetysigns.com/products/hotel-guest-house-fire-action In addition a floor plan is often incorporated showing the exit routes.
  23. AnthonyB

    Corridor doors connected to fire alarms

    If it's a care home you don't have them set to all release like that as the risk from resident's absconding, particularly in dementia care, is far higher than in fire. As you are using staff to evacuate the compartment of origin they would use the local overrides at each door, leaving the compartments not in fire secure (important as all the staff are busy in the compartment on fire or at the control panel awaiting the fire service). There would be a manual override that would release all the doors at the fire panel as a back up, but properly managed progressive evacuation rarely needs it. You should seek advice from a third party certified fire risk assessor with decent care home experience who can give advice specific to your situation and importantly put it in your risk assessment.
  24. Tom Sutton

    CPD

    Check out https://blog.coltinfo.co.uk/webinar-calendar I do not know if it is approved but they do issue CPD certificates.
  25. AnthonyB

    CPD

    IFE branches often arrange days, nonmembers can go but pay more. Colt do lots of smoke control webinars, fire alarm equipment manufacturers do cpd days too
  26. Can anyone please tell me what points must be included on fire action notices located inside guest house bedrooms? Thank you
  27. Horizontal positioning affects the ability of the device to self-close the door. Check with Geofire before installing in a fixing position that differs from the installation instructions.
  28. Hello Everybody, I came across this very knowledgeable forum whilst trying to find an answer to this question, I do apologise if it has already been answered elsewhere: To what degree will a single storey, detached timber frame chalet I will be building (a self-build project) require a) cavity barriers, and b) fire stopping measures? The wall construction will be timber stud with voids totally filled with Warmcel insulation or similar. There will be a 38mm ventilation cavity between the outer sheathing boards/breather membrane and the timber cladding, but this is required to dry the walls after periods of driving rain. There will also be a 45mm service cavity on the inside between the vapour barrier and the 12.5mm plasterboard inner lining. The roof construction will be timber rafters with voids totally filled with Warmcel insulation or similar. The roof will have a 55mm ventilation cavity between the sheathing/breather membrane and the metal roofing sheets, and a 38mm service cavity between the vapour barrier and in the 12.5mm plasterboard inner lining. The plasterboard will follow the line of the rafters and there will be no loft space. This build is in Wales and so will have a fire suppression system installed (likely to be watermist) and all rooms will have an exit door or window to outside and a place of safety so there will be no protected escape routes. There will be no garage attached and the total floor area will be 63m2. I believe I am correct in saying that the chalet will not require compartment walls. The plasterboard will be mounted onto 38 or 45mm timber battens, which I believe could act as a barrier in the service cavity if necessary as they also run horizontally along the top and bottom of the walls, around openings etc? The Building Regulations don't seem to mention small, single storey structures in this respect and assume that all buildings will have at least two storeys and cavity walls (which I suppose many do, to be fair). I don't know if the same rules will apply here or if they are geared more towards safety and escape from larger/semi detached houses etc. The way I read the regulations is that cavity barriers and fire stopping are required at joints between fire separating elements, and if I don't have compartment walls, do I need them, and if so, to what extent? If I have any of this wrong then please correct me, I am eager to learn. I'm sorry this is such a long post, but I thought it best to give as much information as possible now to help build a picture of the proposed build. I may be able to post CAD drawings if it would make it any clearer! Thank you in advance. Martin
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