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Guest TomEddl

Halon equivalent

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Guest TomEddl

As Station Manager at an Airport with approval to retain Halon extinguishers until 2016, I have looked at many alternatives, in particular the use of inert gas. What quantities would I need to equate a 9kg BCF as I can't find any Class B Ratings on the old extinguishers? Thank you

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There is a number of agents that can be used as a replacement for Halon and the best one will depend on the individual risk, the volume of the area in question etc.

Dependant on the current installation , existing pipe work and discharge equipment will normally have to be changed due to pressures, fluid flow rates etc.

Feel free to PM me and I can pass on a couple of contact details of some individuals that will be able to help.

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There is a number of agents that can be used as a replacement for Halon and the best one will depend on the individual risk, the volume of the area in question etc.

Dependant on the current installation , existing pipe work and discharge equipment will normally have to be changed due to pressures, fluid flow rates etc.

CWEENG, I believe you have miss-understood / miss-read the question.

Sorry but Tom Eddl said

As Station Manager at an Airport with approval to retain Halon extinguishers until 2016..............What quantities would I need to equate a 9kg BCF

Which to me means, he is the fire station manager at a working airport, and currently has the option to use portable BCF fire extinguishers, of which he has at least one 9KG BCF, he seems to be seeking a replacement for this 9KG BCF portable extinguisher (or maybe he has more than one) he does not seem to be looking for a replacement for a fixed installation system.

But perhaps you can confirm or deny the following.

As a rough estimate, you need 1.5 times as much "halon replacement" as you do halon 1211, which would mean that for a 9kg BCF you would need a 13.5 KG extinguisher, But they do not make a portable halon replacement extinguisher in that size.

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From AnthonyB he say's

As for replacement, you will be lucky to find a drop in clean agent of comparable performance that's readily available other than for the 1.5kg portable. The Police have gone for 1kg FE-36, it obviously impressed at trials, however due to its niche market the chosen unit hasn't had fire rating tests.

Most oversea manufacturers of clean agent are influenced by the more relaxed US codes and use Halotron (not allowed in the EU), but high capacity FE-36 in portables and trolleys are available (up to 12Kg).

Unless you really want a clean agent the way is now high performance powder and high performance foams, although don't knock the 5 kilo CO2 as these can now get a 70B rating (I've even seen higher) which is more comparable with BCF than in the past, although of course the effective discharge range is less.

I can dig some old fire rating info for portable BCF's out tomorrow, although there may not be any for @9kg as many manufacturers didn't go to the expense of fire rating tests for small order sizes, only testing stuff in the 1-3kg range

DuPont says that FE36 is almost effective as BCF but I would sooner hear it from an independent assessor and would err on the side of safety for green-foam's 1.5 times by going for a lager capacity extinguisher.

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Anthony hasn't come back and I cannot find any information regarding fire ratings on clean agents.

What I have found was the only acceptable replacement for Halon 1211 (BCF) appears to be FE-36 because it is the only one accepted in Europe, but even then it is not as efficient. The cup burner test method for BCF gives 4.1 % and for FE 36 gives 6.4%. Although the test is for total flooding it does show how efficient they are at extinguishing fires and as green-foam said you would need half as much more extinguishing agent to extinguisher the same fire.

Check out http://www2.dupont.com/FE/en_US/assets/downloads/pdf/h77974_FE-36_PUSH.pdf also http://www.fire.tc.faa.gov/systems/handheld/handheld.asp it may give some more avenues of research like adiabatic expansion nozzles. It is American website but the research is international and may give you some ideas.

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Guest

Hi,

I was wondering if you could please provide me with some further guidance. I am looking to install a new portable extinguisher on an Aircraft. Due to new legislation I cannot install Halon. I have been looking at using a Halotron 1 extinguisher but noticed on your website you mention HCFC Blend b is not authorised in the UK, is this the case or are aircraft exempt from this?

Any information would be much appreciated.

Many thanks

Scott

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Halon is still used on board aircraft but very expensive new, however there are a few floating about second hand (Talking recently to an airport fire fighter and extinguisher buff BS5306-3 doesn't apply and the maintenance regime for on board extinguishers is such there is some extremely old stuff in service!).

Whilst some cut off dates have been and gone the small aviation sector still seems to be using halon based on the EU 2025 deadline.

http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/articles/2011_q4/3/

http://www.fia.uk.com/resourceLibrary/eu-commission-regulations.html

It depends on the type of aircraft you fly but I do accept it is very confusing.

Halotron is illegal in the EU, water and halon is the principles in use although Novec 1230 & FM-200 are also available.

Whilst FE-36 is the EU's main portable halon replacement it doesn't appear to tick the boxes for aircraft use.

UK supplier of Halon portables for on board use:
http://www.transair.co.uk/pp+Aircraft-Halon-Fire-Extinguishers-From-FFE+2787

US manufacturer of halon & halon alternatives:
http://www.h3raviation.com/products.htm

Compose with the help of AnthonyB

 

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Guest Paul Peterson

I have heard that it has been agreed that FM200 is to be phased out by 2030 is that correct and if so can you give me a supporting agreement or article that I can refer to please

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More or less true, yes. All F-Gas agents (including those used in extinguishing such as FM200 [ HFC-227ea] or FE36 [ HFC-236fa ]) are subject to the EU phased reduction in availability of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) by 79% between 2015 and 2030. As such year on year supply will become more difficult to come by and more expensive, although it will be a little longer before complete withdrawal..

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/hfc-phase-down-in-the-eu-how-it-works-and-exemptions

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/387955/F_gases.pdf

http://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/f-gas/legislation/index_en.htm

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Guest Haisam

Hello everybody, 

Your help will make a great contribution to my master thesis. 

I assume that halon has already been phased out by now. 

Several european airports have decided to settle for conventional foam, powder or water based fire extinguishers and kept their hands of  halocarbons.

By halocarbons I mean: FE-36, FM-200, Halotron I and the newly developed Halotron BrX(2BTP)

I haven't heard about 3M Novec and inert gases in europe neither...

Is it similar in the USA?

Many Thanks and best Regards

Haitham

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The US has been heavily into halocarbons for well over 20 years with Halotron & FE-36 portables being sold as standard items for all uses, not just air.

The fact that some Halocarbons such as Halotron are prohibited in the EU, plus the poor mass for mass comparative performance of other agents in portable form means that Halon substitutes in portables never took off in the general market and the specialist market that needed halon has held onto it to the last minute of the replacement deadlines, begrudgingly accepting media such as FE-36 when they couldn't hold on to halon any longer.

Whilst newer developments such as Novec are well performing, their high cost,plus the fact that the non vapourising liquid halon alternatives have had 20 years to become established, means that unless something amazingly cheap & effective comes along then most of Europe will be sticking to non VL agents

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Guest J Wyeth

My dad has just moved into a house and I noticed a halon fire extingushire and I’m wondering if we had a small house fire inside the house will we be allowed to discharge it? As aircrafts and milltary can still own and discharge halon and why can’t we it’s just favouritism under the equality act. I think we should be able to own and discharge halon in our own homes if plane or military or underground train staff can. I think the ban should be abolished and put halon back on sale regardless of the ozone layer because of how effective the extingushire is. 

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I am afraid the world is not very fair and if you break the ban you could find yourself in court.

Halon Fire Extinguishers

The ban on Halon fire extinguishers was implemented following the Montreal Protocol of 1987 and subsequent extension at Kyoto a decade later. The details are in EC Regulation 3093/94 and EC 2037/2000 and the UK Hazardous Waste regulations 2005

Exceptions to the Rule
The EU ban on the use of Halon in fire extinguishers actually came into force in October 2000 and was implemented in the UK in 2003, as a result of scientific research linking Halon and other CFC’s to Ozone depletion. The ban in practice is not total.

Existing owners and users of Halon 1211 portable fire extinguishers may be able to claim exemption to the EU ban for certain “Critical Uses”.

Broadly speaking, this includes limited applications within the aircraft industry, military / armed forces, petrochemical industry and some specific marine applications. Refilling of existing Halon systems covered by these exemptions should also be from recycled Halon stocks. Halon 1301 is the version preferred in fixed fire suppression systems and its current use is also tightly controlled, although it is installed in the Channel Tunnel. The exemption can also extend to applications that can be justified on the basis of National security.

Safe Disposal
Not only is it illegal to own a Halon fire extinguisher not covered by these exemptions, it is also illegal to simply dump them or discharge the contents. Fire and Safety Centre can arrange collection and safe disposal (please note this is a chargeable service and is priced per kg) or you can contact your Local Council Waste Management department for advice.

Identification
Older Halon extinguishers are normally colour coded British Racing Green so is easy to spot, but variants on this colour are out there. The military use dark bottle green as you might expect and yellow and gold also turn up. They are now also supplied red with a green colour flash. You are most likely to come across a Green Halon fire extinguisher in an Aircraft where they are still permitted in the absence of an approved replacement.

Alternatives
Because of the strict regulations governing the storage and use of Halon it is not possible for Fire and Safety Centre to stock or sell this type of fire extinguisher. We offer two alternatives. For general portable use CO2 extinguishers provide the same protection for sensitive electronics and valuables. In fixed applications, for example, in boats, switch rooms, plant and machinery we offer FE-36 automatic fire extinguishers which is a more environmentally safe, non-corrosive and nonconductive gas based system.

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You will also find most of those special user exemptions are now expired and the only remaining use of any note is on board aircraft and that expires soon so that no one will be allowed to use it.

I suggest you also actually read the Equality Act.....😁

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